March jobs for the garden

Greengage TeamMonthly jobs for the garden

snowdrops

March is a time when lots of people start to think about their gardens again. The winter months are finally on their way out and gardens are springing to life. Occasional sunny days mean that we spend more time in our gardens and notice what needs doing next.  Here are a few of the many jobs that March brings.

Hedges

Nesting birds mean you must avoid work between March and August. So early march is your last chance but you must check carefully as some birds will have begun to nest. ‘It is an offence under Section 1 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act of 1981 to intentionally take, damage or destroy the nest of any wild bird while it is in use or being built, or to intentionally kill, injure or take chicks or adults, or intentionally take or destroy any eggs.’

Read more at:
https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wildlife/advice/gardening-for-wildlife/plants-for-wildlife/garden-hedges/hedge-law/#OYthfgvpDpLAh3Lh.99

Paths

Now is a good time to get those paths clear and to get a head start on the weeds. Jobs such as jet washing can give an instant lift to areas in what can be quite a colourless time of year.

Fertilisation and mulching

It is the perfect time to get some nutrients into your soil for summer growing. Choose peat free composts or get down to your own compost bins and get digging in that fabulous nutrient rich goodness. Leaf mould, (which is not necessarily nutrient rich) creates very versatile soil and can work as an excellent ground mulch. Bark can also work as a good mulch, suppressing weeds and holding in moisture whilst creating an attractive natural look to a bed or path.

Planting

Early potatoes can go straight outside, time to get your herbs started inside and plant your summer bulbs – greengage favourites include the striking Allium and vibrant Crocosmia.

Moving shrubs

If you need to move shrubs or young deciduous trees, it is a good time to move them now before the ground becomes too hard.

Lawns

If you get a dry day you may have had already cut your lawns, remember to set the blade relatively high on your mower so you don’t damage the grass.

Words: Jude Eastick, Company Director & Head Gardener